Move Over Perpetual Motion Machines, There's Now a Perpetual Data Machine – Big Data!

The economist's economists at The Economist have apparently found a replacement for oil, and it isn't even a form of energy

It's comfortably accepted by many that what we in the first-world countries currently live in is a post-industrial era, an era in which a transition has been made from manufacturing-based economies to service sector-based economies. But to put truth to the lie, "post-industrialism" is polite speak for "a gutted manufacturing sector whose jobs were offshored to countries where wages were lower, enacted so that deep pockets could be deepened and so that those whose employment existed in higher echelons than the offshored could gain access to cheaper products." *

But if you giddily follow along with the rags and raggees extolling

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Having Dissed Edward Snowden, Should Barack Obama Pardon Bernie Madoff?

Barck Obama didn't jail a single banker. So seeing how he won't pardon Edward Snowden, why not show his true mettle by pardoning Bernie Madoff?

Tis the season for presidential pardons, and all throughout the land the peasants are calling for their Caesar to release not Barabbas this time but the other guy. The "other guy" isn't exactly Jesus of course, but he is nonetheless rather well known for staunchly "speaking truth to power". I'll avoid a re-cap of the shenanigans at play, instead summing it all up by pointing out that yes, the "other guy" – Edward Snowden – did most certainly break the law. However, is breaking the law always such a bad thing? As Martin Luther King Jr. put it,

To accept passively an

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Forget Austerity and Grexit – it's Time for a Gretaway!

Austerity and "Grexits" will increasingly result in people getting triaged from the industrial economy and basics such as food. The alternative? Gretaway! [part 3/3]

So here we are on this precipice of sorts, staring upon the twilight of the industrial economy due to peaking energy supplies and thus peaking credit supplies (as explained in part 2 of this 3-part series).

Simply put, being on the peak oil plateau, and with fossil fuel supplies in general reaching their limits (and getting more expensive to extract), there's going to increasingly be less and less of the stuff to go around. This means one of two things, the first being that what's left gets spread around thinner and thinner between all the participants. However, since people of

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Crashing Oil Prices Aren't Due to an Oil Glut But to Demand Destruction and Peaking Credit

Since money is a proxy for energy, energy's limits are putting a damper on credit creation. Could this be the cause for plunging stock markets & oil prices? [part 2/3]

As I began to mention at the end of the first part of this three-parter, I've only just recently come to the conclusion that oil prices aren't going to have a tendency to rise due to the tightening of supply imposed by peak oil, but to depreciate. This of course flies in the face of the common logic of supply and demand, but when factoring in the method by which the majority of our money is created, a deflationary effect can be seen to come into play. This has taken me an absurdly long time to clue into, for although

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Peak Oil Ass-Backwards: Fractional-Reserve Banking, Meet Peak Oil

Peak oil's supply constraints are said to lead to an increase in prices. But does fractional-reserve banking's tie-in not instead imply decreased prices? [part 1/3]

If the ongoing crash of oil prices over the past year – and now the stock market crashes of last week – have continuously taught me one thing, that would be that I've got very little clue regarding the economic implications of peak oil. To explain this I'll have to take a circuitous, roundabout route here, but if you've been as afflicted as I've been then you might find the following a bit illuminating.

For starters, even though I learned about peak oil in 2005, fractional-reserve banking in 2006, and pretty much instantly proceeded to put two and two together, I still

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  ALLAN STROMFELDT CHRISTENSEN  2020